Jiva: A Background

Who are we?

We are a group of psychologists, social workers and teachers working for youth under the banner of The Promise Foundation (TPF). We have come together to develop research driven applications to build capacity for career counselling and livelihood planning services in India and the developing world.


What is Jiva?

The word Jiva means 'life' in most of the Indian languages. The Jiva programme is based on the premise that a healthy career is integrally connected to one's life.

Contemporary economic development has dramatically altered earlier notions of work and career. The young person is presented today with a bewildering array of occupational possibilities.

Jiva has been designed to support the career and livelihood planning needs of Indian young people through culturally relevant career counselling services.

The term 'career counselling' is an oft heard one today and is linked mainly to the urban context. But what of the ancient traditions that underlie the practice of livelihoods? Is a 'career' without meaningless migration to 'city jobs' possible for the rural young person? And conversely, would a city slicker consider careers in the rural sector?

Jiva interprets career into the Indian economic context, drawing from the roots of our culture to support the career development and livelihood planning of all contemporary Indian young people.

Click here for a more detailed description of the Jiva framework for career counselling and livelihood planning.


Evolution of the Jiva Project

Work Awareness and You (WAY):

Glimpses from WORCC-IRS


Work Awareness and You (WAY) is TPF's earliest career guidance intervention. WAY is conducted in schools and helps young people discover their talents and interests and obtain information about career opportunities.

Click here for further information about the WAY programme.

Indian Regional Survey : With a view to scaling up the WAY programme, in 2005, The Promise Foundation conducted a large survey called Work Orientations and Responses to Career Choices: Indian Regional Survey (WORCC-IRS).

Data from this survey was discussed by leading social scientists, educators, psychologists and policy makers at a National Consultation on Career Psychology (NCCP). The group was unanimous in its agreement that career counselling is an urgently felt need.

Click here for the final reports of the NCCP.

Four critical action points were identified by WORCC-IRS and formulated by the NCCP into the following recommendations:

Recommendation 1: Use the WORCC-IRS findings to develop culturally validated teaching-learning material for careers education suitable for the Indian context.
Recommendation 2: Develop a skilled workforce to deliver career counselling services around the country by developing curricula and courses to equip personnel at various skill levels.
Recommendation 3: Develop model Career Resource Centres where different approaches to career guidance and livelihood planning could be show cased.
Recommendation 4: Draw the attention of policy makers to the importance of career counselling and develop a strategy to mainstream career counselling services for Indian students and youth. The Jiva Project emerged from the work described above.

Reports:
Report 1
Report 2

Further information:
Jiva's Rationale and Background
Jiva Action Points and Project Implementation Strategy